Nominate now for the 2011 Unsung hero awards South Australia

National Science Week (SA) and Australian Science Communicators (SA)

are proud to jointly offer the

2011 UNSUNG HERO AWARDS OF
SOUTH AUSTRALIAN SCIENCE

These awards aim to recognise those who have not yet received significant recognition for their contribution to science or science communication.
There are 2 awards: the Unsung Hero of South Australian Science and the Unsung Hero of South Australian Science Communication.

Applications close in July. Please contact Rona rona.sakko@csiro.au for further information and a nomination form.

Please read the criteria for each award carefully to ensure that nominations are made for the appropriate award.

Unsung Hero of South Australian Science

This award honours a person or group, at this particular time, who exemplifies the aims and objectives of National Science Week and Australian Science Communicators (SA).

The criteria for nomination for the UNSUNG HERO OF SOUTH AUSTRALIAN SCIENCE are as follows:

1. Nominees must reside in South Australia and actively engage in science research, scientific methodology, administration or practice. While nominees should have shown respect for science communication, this award recognises science practitioners in areas other than teaching and communication.

Those whose strengths lie in these latter areas might be suitable nominees for the award of UNSUNG HERO OF SOUTH AUSTRALIAN SCIENCE COMMUNICATION.

2. The work for which the nominee is being nominated must have been carried out in South Australia or, if of national significance, should have considerable relevance to South Australia.

3. The nominee should be a person, people or group who have not yet received significant recognition for their contribution to science. This will almost certainly rule out a ‘top’ or popular scientist.

The nominee should have shown that they regard science communication as an integral part of scientific work.

4. Nominees should have a considerable or prolonged record (at least several years) in science.

The award is intended to recognise those whose contribution has been so significant over a period of time that they should by now have been recognised. It is unlikely that this would apply to a candidate whose contribution, however significant, is of short duration.

5. Nominators must give careful consideration to what counts as ‘science’ – for example, nominees from technological or environmental fields should be nominated not just on the basis of their contribution to those particular fields, but because the scientific side of their work is strong.

Notes:
There will always be more good candidates than can be awarded; therefore there is no shortlist from which a ‘top’ candidate is to be chosen.

This award should identify an exemplar.

This award may be made to a candidate whose work is in science or in a number of related fields (e.g. technology, environment, health etc) where the science component of their work is highly significant.

Factors which may influence the final selection are many and varied and may include topical and political issues, etc.

Unsung Hero of South Australian Science Communication

This award is a companion to the UNSUNG HERO OF SOUTH AUSTRALIAN SCIENCE, and honours a person or group who exemplify science communication.

The criteria for nomination for the UNSUNG HERO OF SOUTH AUSTRALIAN SCIENCE COMMUNICATION are as follows:

1. Nominees must be resident in South Australia and actively engaged in science communication, interpreted broadly to include, but not limited to, pursuits such as:
teaching,
broadcasting,
script and book writing,
science shows,
science promotion and
interpretation of science within cultural institutions.

Those whose strengths lie in other areas such as science research, practice or administration may be suitable nominees for the UNSUNG HERO OF SOUTH AUSTRALIAN SCIENCE award.

2. The work for which the nominee is being nominated must have been carried out in South Australia or, if of national significance, it should have considerable relevance to South Australia.

3. Nominees, whether a person, people or group, should have not yet received significant recognition for their contribution to science and its promotion. This will almost certainly rule out a ‘top’ or popular science communicator. The nominee should have shown that they regard science communication as an integral part of scientific work.

4. Nominees should have a considerable or prolonged record (at least several years) in science communication.

The award is intended to recognise those whose contribution has been so significant over a period of time that they should by now have been recognised. It is unlikely that this would apply to a candidate whose contribution, however significant, is of short duration.

5. Nominators must give careful consideration to what counts as ‘science’ – for example, nominees from technological or environmental fields should be nominated not just on the basis of their contribution to those particular fields, but because the scientific side of their work is strong and their communication contributes to a better understanding of the process and practice of science.

Notes:
There will always be more good candidates than can be awarded; therefore there is no shortlist from which a ‘top’ candidate is to be chosen.

This award may be made to a candidate whose work is specifically in science education, promotion or communication in one or many fields where the science component of their work is highly significant.